A Quick Beginner's Guide to Bicycle Commuting

Are you new to the world of cycling? Then we can easily see how it could be so confusing for you. There is a lot to take in when you start cycling at first in terms of what you need to buy and how you can go about doing it correctly. For anyone who is uncertain about what they should be doing, you simply need to read through this guide.

If you were looking to buy a bike ten or fifteen years ago, you would have found it much easier to get into cycling!

The benefits of cycling to work and the like are obvious, though. It’s less hassle to park up, it’s far cheaper than a car, it keeps you healthy and it saves you a lot of money – what more could you possibly need from a travel option?

We’ll help you find the easiest way to learn how to start bicycle commuting! Everything we list is from personal and professional experience, so you can be sure that it all works out regardless of where you are based. It works by simplifying your bicycle commute. So long as you can find a cycle lane, this will be useful to you.

Benefits of Simplifying Your Bike Commute

  • Minimizes morning excuses – We all know those moments in the morning when we woke up with the intention of riding the bicycle to work but we say the flat tire and we took the car instead. Simplify you commute and you will reduce a big amount of excuses.
  • Reduces stress – When you make sure everything is in place, you’ll have more chances of getting on the bike, even if you overslept.
  • Helps you enjoy the ride – You will definitely not enjoy the ride if you are frazzled. Implement these useful tips to simplify your bicycle commute and you will be freed to highly enjoy your commute. In th end, that’s why we do this anyway.
 Simplify your bike commute for more chances of getting on that bicycle in the morning.

The Length of the Journey

The first thing you need to look at is the length of the journey – if you are going any more than 3 mile then you might want to go for something a bit higher end. Anything less than three miles, though, and you won’t be sitting on the saddle long enough to notice it getting uncomfortable or anything like that so any kind of bike will do, really! If you live in a hilly area with a fair distance to travel, though, it’s best to invest in something a bit more solid. Also, pay attention if you're going to ride in the dark.

Read on bike price tags and other details.

The Bike

  • Gears

You’ll need to think about the gears, as well. Make sure you understand what kind of gears you need as it can go from 1-33 gears. Typically, if you are living in this standard hilly and 3+ mile range than anything from 5-9 gears will be enough for you to get a good workout and be able to actually get through the exercise itself

  • Wheel size

Wheel size comes into the way of thinking, too. Thankfully you only have two common sizes to pick from so it really dos just come down to this – fat tyres are more comfortable skinny tyres are quicker

  • Price

The price obviously matters, as well. Our very basic way to look at it would be no less than £200 or you are buying something a bit dodgy, and no more than £600 as this will get you something that should last for many years and provide absolutely stunning consistency and quality

  • Saddle Height

The saddle height is the last thing we want to consider – you’ll need to find a bike that has a very compromising saddle as very few bikes come prepared for you and you alone. Mess around with it and see if you need an extra few cm on the saddle or not; if you are struggling to reach you risk injury and making the whole thing harder on yourself, so make sure it’s a good fit for you

  • Check your bicycle each and every weekend

Riding frequently will cause wear on most of the consumable parts of the bike and you will want to make sure you fix any mechanical problems early:

  • Tire damage and wear
  • Tire pressure
  • Brakes for stopping power and wear
  • Tightness of quick releases
  • Chain for rust, dryness, and stiff links

Also, don't forget about the bike locks!

At the Office

  • Store necessities at the office

Keep everything you need after your bicycle commute (towels, wipes, deodorant, etc). You don’t need to carry them back and forth daily.

  • Carry flat repair materials

Buy a decent saddle bag and pack it with tire levers, pump, patch kit, hex wrenches, and an extra lube. Always keep the saddle bag on your bike – you will always have everything you need to fix a flat.

  • Take everything you need for commuting on Monday

First, leave a pair of shoes at work. You never know when you’ll need them. Second, there’s no need to drive on Monday to take what you need for commuting the rest of the week. The five changes of clothes will perfectly fit in a backpack.

  • Keep an extra set of clothes at work

Keep an extra pair of jeans, an extra belt, shirt, t-shirt, underwear, bra, etc at work at all times. It’s terrifying to remember halfway into your bike commute that you forgot something essential.

 What you need at the office for bike commuting.

The Best Cycling Route

In terms of the trip itself, use Google Maps to find the best cycling route that you can take – they’ll provide you with everything you need in a map that you can follow, making life so much simpler for yourself in the long run

Designing a minimalistic bike commute will make it much easier to opt for your two-wheeled transportation on a more regular basis. The daily stress of between waking up and walking out the door will also be reduced.

 What's the best cycling route for bicycle commuting? Find out here.

Finally, keep your head on straight

The most important thing when it comes to riding in the city is keep your head on straight. Always know what’s happening around you, always throw a short glance over your shoulder when changing direction. Are you listening to music? Use only one earbud.

Stop at every red light. Don’t shoal. Don’t pull out into crosswalks.

Keep you head on straight.

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